Published On: November 15th, 2023Categories: Money

If Money Were No Object, Here’s Where People Would Live

If Money Were No Object, Here’s Where People Would Live

“If you could live anywhere (no regulations, infinite money), where would you live?”

This question launched a recent online discussion. Here’s where users would live if they didn’t have to worry about being able to afford it or qualify for complicated visas.

Let us know your choice in the comments.

Live in a couple of places

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“I’d have 2-3 residences and move based on time of year. Money solves almost all problems, but not the weather.”

Northern summers, southern winters

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“You cannot beat summers in the Pacific Northwest (British Columbia, Washington). Then, I’d live at warm beaches for winter in Florida or California or some tropical places.”

Bring the whole crew along

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“If money isn’t an issue, just move your whole friend group around!”

Head to France

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“Probably Nice in the south of France, but I also enjoy PNW locations like Vancouver and Seattle.”

“I live in Cannes, which is right next door to Nice. It is really nice. I think the scenery and weather is really what does it though. People here are a lot nicer than in the northern parts of France.”

France’s rich neighbor

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“Probably Monaco for me.”

 Maybe just sit tight (in Norway)

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“I actually think I would stay put where I am. This must be what contentment feels like…”

Get away from everyone

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“Cabin in the woods. MY WOODS.”

From Switzerland to Italy

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“I live in Switzerland. It’s lovely, but I’d move to Italy instantly if the financial/job aspect wouldn’t be an issue. Italy is just much more enjoyable with the people, food, culture , architecture, natural diversity…you name it.”

Life on three coasts

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“I would spend summer in Portugal, fall and spring in North Carolina, and winter in California.”

Turn the heat off

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“Iceland or Norway. I hate sun and hot weather. I love the cold and the dark. I would be happy for the half year that there is only a few hours of daylight. But I would have to find something else for the 6 months of constant sun. Maybe Fuerteventura (Canary island off Spanish coast). It’s always windy, so even though its in the mid 70s during summer, it’s comfortable. If I have to deal with sun, this would be a place I would enjoy it.”

New York state of mind

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“I live in New York City. If I had unlimited money, there wouldn’t be any reason to leave. Well, except to get away from winter for 3 months.”

New Hampshire vibes

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“On the face of it, New Hampshire seems like a great state for me. It’s got the lowest rate of violent crime in the U.S. It’s got no state income tax. In my imagination, it’s got that homely small town vibe. A lot of the south of the state is commutable to Boston. It seems to have that individualistic, get go libertarian attitude of your red state without the social conservatism.”

The hills are alive

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I’d move exactly where I immigrated to: Innsbruck, Austria, here in the heart of the Alps. It’s centrally located in Europe, 30 minutes from Italy and Germany, and has a fantastic climate.”

Ecuador feels like home

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“I’m from NYC; Cuenca is, for me, the best. I love the coast here, too, but it’s too humid to live there. Why Cuenca? The people, the music, the food and the climate. Temps are in the 50’s at night, high of 70’s by day, all year round.”

Head for the Highlands

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“Scotland, hands down. Best country on earth.”

European life on an island

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Photo Credit: Twenty20.

“Maybe Malta? I’d love to open a cat sanctuary and/or feed the feral cats (and spay/neuter).”

…so New Zealand, maybe?

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Photo Credit: Twenty20.

“Any place without winter, without religion controlling the country, with beautiful nature and enough space to live away from other people. No developing countries. No natural disasters like earthquakes, volcanoes, tornadoes, floods/tsunamis, or forest fires consuming half the country.”     Source

Leave a comment and let us know: where would you live if money and immigration visa were no issue?

Americans: Want to Escape the US? Here Are the 10 Easiest Countries to Move To

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More Americans are moving abroad than ever before. Thanks to digital tools like language translation apps and Google maps along with options for remote work, it’s easier now to make a big move abroad. Combined with challenging times in the United States and ever-present wanderlust, people of all ages are seeking greener pastures.

Here are our picks for the 10 easiest countries to move to, along with the visa options that will get you there.

The 10 Easiest Countries to Move To

You Can Get Citizenship by Ancestry in These 20 Countries

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More Americans are pursuing citizenship by ancestry in other countries by tracing their lineage and presenting proof of descent. Some countries, like South Africa, India, Turkey, and the United Kingdom, offer citizenship by ancestry, but at least one of your parents must have citizenship there, but many other countries offer citizenship to more than just the children of citizens.

No matter what country’s citizenship you pursue, the process takes time, and you may need help from an immigration attorney. Facebook groups are a great resource to learn from others who’ve been there.

You Can Get Citizenship by Ancestry in These 20 Countries

How to Leave America: 6 Steps to Your New Life

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Are you thinking about leaving the United States? You’re not alone; as many as 15% percent of Americans say they want to leave the country permanently.

➤ How to Leave America: 6 Steps to Your New Life

Countries Where You Can Live in Peace, Without the Threat of Religious Violence

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If there’s one thing we can learn from this week’s events, it’s this: religious violence has no place in society. It destroys lives and communities, drives political decisions, and slows social progress. Our global community deserves better.

You may be looking for where you can be safe from such violence. Consider these least religious countries where one of the most prominent belief systems is “no religion at all.”

Countries Where You Can Live in Peace, Without the Threat of Religious Violence

 

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Co-founder at Expatsi | + posts

Brett Andrews is the co-founder of Expatsi, a company that helps expats discover how to leave the U.S. Brett and his partner Jen developed the Expatsi Test to recommend countries to move to, based on factors like budget, visa type, spoken languages, healthcare rankings, and more. In a former life, he worked as a software developer, IT support specialist, and college educator. When he's not working, Brett loves watching comic book movies and reading unusual books.

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bed49dc5d4263d6d37b46cb09574d411?s=150&d=mp&r=g
Co-founder at Expatsi | + posts

Brett Andrews is the co-founder of Expatsi, a company that helps expats discover how to leave the U.S. Brett and his partner Jen developed the Expatsi Test to recommend countries to move to, based on factors like budget, visa type, spoken languages, healthcare rankings, and more. In a former life, he worked as a software developer, IT support specialist, and college educator. When he's not working, Brett loves watching comic book movies and reading unusual books.